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Life Is

Who ever said life
Should be worth living?

Life is not the point.

Life is a pebble
On a stair step.

Comments

Rax said…
a fresh insight with existentialist undertones. excellent dose of food for thought, just what i need to start my day. thanks for sharing :D
Anonymous said…
Love this one. I am going to do a post about it at Poets Who Blog.

Thanks for being a part of our blogroll.

Sara
reluctantscribe said…
Hello SquareTraveler,

just popped over from poets who blog. This poem is indeed a little gem. Kind regards from Leipzig, Germany,
Anonymous said…
Succinct zinger. Kudos. I just came over from Poets Who Blog site.

http://janetleigh.wordpress.com

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